World Cup (cricket): history

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This series of articles is mainly about the World Cup insofar as it concerns South Asia. Mentions of other countries' performances are mainly limited to their performance in the finals and their performance against South Asian countries.

The economics of the cricket world cup. Source: The Times of India

This is a collection of articles archived for the excellence of their content.

Contents

The sources of this article include...

Australia: Performance in the Cricket World Cup till 2011, and ICC ranking in Jan 2015. Graphic The Times of India
India: Performance in the Cricket World Cup till 2011, and ICC ranking in Jan 2015. Graphic The Times of India
South Africa: Performance in the Cricket World Cup till 2011, and ICC ranking in Jan 2015. Graphic The Times of India
Sri Lanka: Performance in the Cricket World Cup till 2011, and ICC ranking in Jan 2015. Graphic The Times of India
wc England: Performance in the Cricket World Cup till 2011, and ICC ranking in Jan 2015. Graphic The Times of India
New Zealand: Performance in the Cricket World Cup till 2011, and ICC ranking in Jan 2015. Graphic The Times of India
Pakistan: Performance in the Cricket World Cup till 2011, and ICC ranking in Jan 2015. Graphic The Times of India
West Indies: Performance in the Cricket World Cup till 2011, and ICC ranking in Jan 2015. Graphic The Times of India
Batsmen with the highest number of runs scored. Records in the Cricket World Cup. Graphic: The Times of India
Bowlers who took the most wickets. Records in the Cricket World Cup. Graphic: The Times of India
Most successful captain. Records in the Cricket World Cup. Graphic: The Times of India
Best fielders. Records in the Cricket World Cup. Graphic: The Times of India
Top wicket-keepers. Records in the Cricket World Cup. Graphic: The Times of India
The winners of the Cricket World Cup. Graphic: The Times of India
One Day International (ODI) records. Graphic: The Times of India

Nalin Mehta,TNN | Feb 8, 2015 The Times of India World Cup: What all has changed from 1975 to 2015 <>The Times of India Brief history of the World Cup

1975

The first Men's Cricket World Cup (Prudential Cup): venue England

Number of overs per team: 60

Uniform: white

Colour of balls: red.

Hours of play: daytime.

Participating teams: 6 test playing teams (Australia, England, India, Pakistan, New Zealand the West Indies) plus 2 (Sri Lanka, East Africa) = 8 in all

Winners: West Indies defeated Australia in the finals.

The indomitable Windies, led by Clive Lloyd, took to the format like ducks to water.The skipper himself rose to the task in the final, scoring 102 from 85 balls as the Windies scored 2918 off 60 overs. Viv Richards effected three run outs and in spite of Ian Chappell's fighting 62 the Aussies managed only 274. The dramatic finale made the One-day format hugely popular.

Nalin Mehta’s insight [1]

1975 The first cricket World Cup in 1975 was not even called the World Cup. With only 15 games and a new one-day format that everyone still saw as a "necessary evil" that followed Test matches, insurance-giant Prudential insisted as tournament sponsor that it be called the Prudential Cup.
And so it was, on the silver trophy that Clive Lloyd eventually held aloft and even in the game's bible, Wisden. Yet, charting the early history of the World Cup, cricket writer and historian Gideon Haigh argues the idea was a huge success because "like the best innovations, cricket's World Cup met a need nobody had foreseen." It fulfilled the eternal need of sports fans to dramatically square off their teams and see who was best: in a way that geeky and constantly oscillating rankings could never hope to match.

1979

Prudential Cup: venue England

All 6 test playing teams participated.

Through the ICC Trophy competition, two non-Test playing teams were selected for the World Cup: Sri Lanka and Canada.

Winners: West Indies defeated England in the finals.

Cricket was coming off the controversial Packer era split and the Windies profited by picking a fullstrength team. This time it was the authoritative Richards' turn to stroke a century (138) while Collis King came up with a breezy 86. Boycott and Brearley batted too slowly, and then Joel Garner took five wickets in 11 balls to fashion a 92-run win.

1983

Prudential Cup: venue England

Participating teams: All seven test playing teams (now including Sri Lanka), plus Zimbabwe (selected through the ICC Trophy)

Winners: India defeated West Indies in the finals.

The underdogs rose in dramatic fashion to end West Indies' Cup reign, sparking a frenzy and making the game an intrinsic part of India's cultural fabric. India scored 183, but the Windies appeared overconfident and Kapil Dev's stunning catch to dismiss Richards set up a 43-run win. From then on, ODIs became more popular than Tests.

1987

No longer called Prudential, the 1987 Cricket World Cup was co-hosted by India and Pakistan.

It was now the Reliance World Cup

Number of overs: 50

Participating teams: 8 (Australia, England, India, New Zealand, Pakistan , Sri Lanka, West Indies, Zimbabwe)

Winners: Australia defeated England.

The first-ever World Cup in the subcontinent didn't see any home teams in the final at the Eden.Mike Gatting's reverse sweep off Australian captain Allan Border ended in fatal consequences for England as they lost by 7 runs. The first-ever 50-over Cup saw the Aussies emerge as a major force in the tournament.

1992

Venue: Australia and New Zealand

Uniform of players: A different coloured uniform for each eam

Colour of balls: white

Hours of play: day/night

Participating teams: Participating teams: Australia, England, India, New Zealand, Pakistan, South Africa, Sri Lanka, West Indies, Zimbabwe

South African participated for the first time.

Winners: Pakistan defeated England in the finals.

Imran Khan's glory boys emerged from near elimination in the early rounds to reign supreme at the MCG, with the captain scoring 72 at No. 3 in his final match. Wasim Akram then blew away Botham, Lamb and Co. Coloured clothing, white balls and floodlights all made their debut.

1996

The Wills World Cup

Venue: The Indian subcontinent (India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka)

Participating teams: Australia, England, India, Kenya, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Pakistan, South Africa, Sri Lanka, United Arab Emirates, the West Indies, Zimbabwe

Kenya and Zimbabwe were included.

Winners: Sri Lanka defeated Australia in the final.

Sri Lanka made a strong statement for the minnows worldwide by pulling off a landmark heist, riding on the genius of `Mad Max' Aravinda de Silva, Arjuna Ranatunga's bold leadership and his canny use of strategy to exploit early field restrictions and attack from the first ball of the match.

1999

Venue: The United Kingdom (mainly England but also Wales/ Ireland and Scotland) and the Netherlands.

Participating teams: twelve (as below).

Full Members: Australia, England, India, New Zealand, Pakistan, South Africa, Sri Lanka, the West Indies, Zimbabwe

Associate Members: Bangladesh, Kenya, Scotland

Winners: Australia defeated Pakistan in the final.

Australia began an era of domination, winning the first of three successive Cups. The final was a nocontest as Pakistan capitulated but the best moments came in Australia's semifinal, when a panicky run-out ensured a loss for SA when they needed only one from four balls.

2003

Venue: South Africa, Zimbabwe and Kenya.

Participating teams: fourteen (as below):

Full Members: Australia, Bangladesh, England, India, New Zealand, Pakistan, South Africa, Sri Lanka, the West Indies, Zimbabwe.

Associate Members: Canada, Kenya, Namibia, the Netherlands.

Winners: Australia defeated India in the finals.

Sourav Ganguly's India rode on brilliant performances from `Master Blaster' Sachin Tendulkar to enter the final on a hot run, but were deflated by an imperious Ricky Ponting, who struck 8 sixes in a match-winning 140 not out.In India, however, cricket had made the transition to a hugely marketable brand.

2007

Venue: the West Indies.

Participating teams: sixteen (as below):

Full Members: Australia, Bangladesh, England, India, New Zealand, Pakistan, South Africa, Sri Lanka, the West Indies, Zimbabwe

Associate Members: Bermuda, Canada, Kenya, Ireland, the Netherlands, Scotland

Winners: Australia defeated Sri Lanka in the final.

The lengthy format, thinning crowds, India's early exit and the death of Bob Woolmer all threatened to overshadow the cricket, but eventually the strongest team, Australia, had its say, winning controversially in the twilight against Lanka.Adam Gilchrist was the hero this time.

2011

Venue: The Indian sub-continent (India; Sri Lanka; Bangladesh). The International Cricket Council (ICC) removed Pakistan from the list of co-hosts after the 2009 attack on the Sri Lankan national cricket team in Lahore.

Participating teams: fourteen (as below):

Full Members: Australia, Bangladesh, England, India, New Zealand, Pakistan, South Africa, Sri Lanka, the West Indies, Zimbabwe

Associate Members: Canada, Ireland, Kenya, Netherlands

Winners: India defeated Sri Lanka in the final.

MS Dhoni's unit lived up to its formidable reputation by pulverizing all in their path, the skipper himself dramatically seizing the reins with the bat in the final to enable his team to become the first to win the Cup on home soil.

2015

Venue: Australia and New Zealand.

Participating teams: 14 (Afghanistan, Australia, Bangladesh, England, India, Ireland, New Zealand, Pakistan, Scotland, South Africa, Sri Lanka, United Arab Emirates, West Indies, Zimbabwe)

Winners: Australia beat New Zealand in the final to win its fifth World Cup

How the 2015 WC is different: Nalin Mehta [2]

2015 Cricket's World Cup 2015 is very different from its first edition. Starting on Valentine's Day with 42 matches over 43 days, 14 teams and an estimated global TV audience of over 1 billion, it may be dwarfed in size by the Olympics or the soccer World Cup but remains the holy grail of the cricketing world and generates significant business, much of it in India.
With Amitabh Bachchan sitting in the commentary box for the India-Pakistan game and commentary also in regional languages, it also promises to be a different viewing experience, reflective as much of India's madness for the game as that madness shaping it.
There is a reason why the tournament's first half in the group stages is essentially predictable: to ensure against an early exit by India or any of the big teams. Organizers and sponsors know what happened in 2007 when India and Pakistan crashed out of the Caribbean World Cup early. It killed TV interest in India and ruined the business that sustains such events. In 2015 everyone waited for the quarterfinals when the big games really began.
Australia has always been seen as the land of pace and bounce, and New Zealand of seam and swing. Five of seven knockout games in this World Cup, therefore, were played on drop-in pitches, curated away from the venue and dropped in before the games, which significantly reduced the special peculiarity of local playing-conditions. The advent of pre-fabricated surfaces even prompted one Australian writer to call the tournament a "rental World Cup".

The other big change from the 2011 World Cup is the introduction of two new balls: one from each end. This is a good move aimed at checking the batting bias in one-day internationals (ODIs), with batsmen scoring more and more runs in each edition of the World Cup. The 1996 and 1999 editions produced over 14,000 runs each, but from 2003 onwards, each World Cup had produced over 18,000 runs. The two new balls rule was expectedto aid fast bowlers but may also diminish the role of spinners. India, with its mediocre bowling attack, for example, faced an uphill task.

A 2007 [Indian] legislation mandated compulsory telecasts of Indian cricket matches on public broadcaster Doordarshan (DD), irrespective of whether it had bought rights or not, the tortuous travails of legal cricketing battles around TV have been almost riveting as those on it. In 2015, Delhi High Court weighed in, ruling that DD can only show the matches on its terrestrial network, not on its channels compulsorily carried on cable and satellite.

Taking into account the huge money paid by broadcaster Star India for these matches, a bench of Justices B D Ahmed and Vibhu Parekh ruled that the law meant to provide "access to the largest number of viewers, on a free-to-air basis" and its ruling seeks to balance these two factors. "There is no change in law as a result of this," says a Star India spokesperson. "However, the implementation of this Act till now was flawed as these events of national importance were available to private cable and DTH operators as well. The High Court has only held that this is incorrect per the Act."

After a year in which the ODI ratings consistently lagged behind those for T20 ratings and the ODI-format itself faced questions, the World Cup 2015 was expected to give it a fillip. In 2014, peak ratings for ODI series dipped to 2.0 TVR (compared to 3.9-4.1 in 2011-13).

Whether it was Kapil running backwards for an eternity from mid-on to send Viv Richards back in the 1983 finals or Imran's famous pep-talk in his "ready-to-pounce" T-shirt in 1992, every World Cup brings with it its own legend. In 2011, it was about Sachin and the palpable desperation of one man for the Cup that animated India.

Fascinating facts about World Cups

Author: MS Ramakrishnan, Bangalore, Thu, Jan 22 2015 CricBuzz 1 <>CricBuzz 2 <>CricBuzz 3 <>CricBuzz 4 <>CricBuzz 5

1977: The revolution of ODI cricket Many top cricketers turned pirate with the inception of the Kerry Packer series in 1977. It was this series which paved way for the modernization of ODI cricket with coloured clothing and floodlit fixtures coming on later. Eventually, since 1992, teams began to the play the World Cup with coloured clothing and white cricket balls.

Man of the Match awards: Men for the big occasion Mohinder Amarnath (1983), Aravinda De Silva (1996) and Shane Warne (1999) hold the unique record of winning Man of the Match awards in both semifinal and final of the World Cup games.

Bowling averages: The best and worst bowling average Pakistani batsman Mohammad Yousuf has the best bowling average (0.00) in World Cup history. Yousuf took the wicket of Zimbabwe's Christopher Mpofu with the very first ball he bowled in the 2007 World Cup. Contrastingly, New Zealand off-spinner John Bracewell has the worst average. Featuring in two World Cups (1983, 1987), Bracewell played seven matches, conceded 310 runs and picked up just 1 wicket, meaning he had an average of 310.

Highest run-getter in World Cups During his knock of 52 against the Netherlands in the 2003 World Cup, Sachin Tendulkar surpassed Javed Miandad (1083) to become the highest run-getter in World Cup history. Eventually, Tendulkar finished with 2278 runs in World Cups.

Youngest World Cup winner Aged 22 years and 3 months, Piyush Chawla was the youngest to taste World Cup success when MS Dhoni's devils defeated Sri Lanka in Mumbai in 2011.


Highest (cumulative) number of runs scored in all World Cup matches put together 2278 Runs scored by Sachin Tendulkar in 45 matches, the most in Cup history. The Times of India

Highest individual score 188: by South Africa's Gary Kirsten against UAE in '96 The Times of India

Highest (cumulative) number of wickets taken in all World Cup matches put together 71 Wickets by Australia's Glenn McGrath in 39 games, the most in WCs The Times of India

New Zealand in the semi-finals

THE GREAT KIWI SEMIFINAL JINX

The Times of India Mar 23 2015

After this article was written, NZ won the semi-finals of the 2015 World Cup, though it lost in the finals.

It's not just South Africa who choke in big matches. New Zealand too have failed to cross the semifinal barrier, losing in all their six previous World Cup attempts. They will hope it's a case of seventh-time lucky on Tuesday. Below is the Black Caps' litany of last-four woes:

1975, THE OVAL

New Zealand 158 (G Howarth 51; B Julien 4-27) lost to the West Indies 159-5 (A Kallicharran 72, G Greenidge 55) by 5 wkts Left-arm paceman Bernard Julien's haul was mainly responsible for New Zealand batting fewer than 53 of their then scheduled 60 overs. A secondwicket stand of 125 between Gordon Greenidge and Alvin Kallicharran then took the West Indies to the brink of victory.

1979, OLD TRAFFORD

New Zealand 212-9 (J Wright 69) lost to England 221-8 (G Gooch 71, M Brearley 53) by 9 runs New Zealand great Richard Hadlee took a miserly one for 32 in 12 overs but fifties from Graham Gooch and England captain Mike Brearley saw the hosts to a decent total. Opener John Wright anchored New Zealand's chase but failed to find support from the other end as NZ lost wickets at regular intervals. 1992, AUCKLAND New Zealand 262-7 (M Crowe 91, K Rutherford 50) lost to Pakistan 264-6 (Inzamam-ul-Haq 60, Javed Miandad 57 no) by 4 wkts New Zealand captain Martin Crowe led from the front and helped New Zealand set Pakistan a stiff chase. Pakistan were 140 for four after 35 overs, needing 123 from the last 15. Inzamam-ul-Haq announced himself to the world with a brilliant innings of 60.

1999, OLD TRAFFORD

New Zealand 241-7 lost to Pakistan 242-1 (Saeed Anwar 113 no, Wajahatullah Wasti 84) by 9 wkts New Zealand managed what seemed a decent total, but were undone by a superb opening partnership of 194 between openers Saeed Anwar and Wajahatullah Wasti. The match ended in chaos when Roger Twose abandoned an attempt to catch Anwar as spectators charged on to the field, with the remaining two runs awarded later by the umpires.

2007, KINGSTON

New Zealand 208 (M Muralitharan 4-31) lost to Sri Lanka 289-5 (M Jayawardene 115 no, U Tharanga 73) by 81 runs S ri Lanka piled up an imposing total. In reply, New Zealand struggled with the bat, with offspin great Muttiah Muralitharan taking four wickets.

2011, RPS COLOMBO

New Zealand 217 (S Styris 57) lost to Sri Lanka 220-5 (T Dilshan 73, K Sangakkara 54) by 5 wkts New Zealand struggled for runs, with Scott Styris playing largely a lone hand. Fine fifties from Dilshan and Sangakkara meant that they inflicted another defeat upon NZ. AFP

See also

World Cup (cricket): history <>World Cup (cricket): 1975 <>World Cup (cricket): 1979 <>World Cup (cricket): 1983 <>World Cup (cricket): 1987 <>World Cup (cricket): 1992 <>World Cup (cricket): 1996 <>World Cup (cricket): 1999 <>World Cup (cricket): 2003 <>World Cup (cricket): 2007 <>World Cup (cricket): 2011 <>World Cup (cricket): 2015

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